Texas

The Flip Side

As I was watching the news yesterday, the first three stories ran in this order: a 15 year-old black girl was thrown and slammed to the ground by a white police officer in McKinney, Texas. Second, a white man is currently on trial for shooting an 8 year-old black boy in the face at their apartment complex. Last, a white officer is currently on trial for shooting and killing an unarmed 60 year-old black man in the back as he ran from his car during a traffic stop.
If you are not, as America labels it, “black”, would these stories have any effect on you? Can you relate to them in any way? Do any of these stories disturb you? Well, let’s take a trip to what I call, the flip-side. Doodle-doo-doodle-doo-doodle-doo-doop.
As I was watching the news yesterday, the first three stories ran in this order: a white, 15 year old (a minor), female was thrown and slammed to the ground by a black police officer in McKinney, Texas. Second, a black man is currently on trial for shooting an 8 year-old white boy in the face at their apartment complex. Last, a black officer is currently on trial for shooting and killing an unarmed 60 year old white man in the back as he ran from his car during a traffic stop.

Okay… How do you feel now?

Whether the person is black or white, wrong is wrong and right is right…

– Jah Soul

Missouri

We concentrate on the problem but never the solution.
Leaving things open ended, never coming to conclusions.
Big Hero 6’ing, trying to sound amazing when you are only amusing.
Thinking you’re pin pointing the issues while you’re only pointing fingers; accusing.
I need action, words mean nothing to me.
Was born in Texas, but today, I’m from Missouri.
We say we want better but do nothing to get it.
Scream we’re for the movement but when it stalls, we quit it.
Tired of listening to your spiels on the struggle when you spit it.
Because when it calls for your participation, you aren’t with it.
Brother please, you’re no activist to me.
I once lived in Virginia, but today, I’m from Missouri.
Seen and heard it all from you wannabe’s, all you do is talk.
When the path is traveled, you silently walk.
And that’s why many of you end up outlined in chalk.
Tried to run before you even crawled or walked.
All I’m saying is “wake up”, if you want to impress me.
Dallas is my city, but today, I’m from Missouri.
Wondering why I say I’m from Missouri, because it’s the show-me-state.
I don’t like chatter, it’s time for us to demonstrate.
We’ll never get anything by just debating and sitting around.
Time to physically move, putting something down.
Even when the situation is black on black, instead of black and white.
We should be ready to march, speak and sacrifice.
Actions speak louder than words, keep the talk, don’t bore me.
Until you all are ready, I’m from Missouri. Show-me!!!

– Thomas D. Payne

Texas, It Is Time For Change…

In the State of Texas, jail is a big business and the great state loves to lock people up…and for a long time, I might add. Many people that are serving life sentences are first-time offenders. It has been said that young people, especially males, do not reach a full level of maturity until they are at least 25 years old. Look at car insurance companies; the rates are higher until you reach 25, right? Is it possible this is because these young people have more accidents? Could it be that these young people do not demonstrate responsibility? Although these emerging adults make poor decisions, most of the time, they mature and learn to make conscious decisions. A United States Department of Justice report states, “Many juvenile offenders do not continue their law-violating behaviors into adulthood”. This statement alone, proves that young people are not mentally mature enough to make sound decisions, but as they get older, they change.
Ms. Edna Watts is a concerned mother of a son who is currently incarcerated. He was sentenced to 99 years in prison for aggravated robbery when he was 19 and this was his first offense. Although he has matured, is a Christian mentor to his fellow inmates and is a certified paralegal, he is not eligible to apply for parole until he has served at least half of his sentence. Texas does not consider good conduct time, work time and flat time credit for 3-G (aggravated sentence) offenders. These offenders can show signs of maturity and rehabilitation and the state will not allow them to apply for parole.
Ms. Watts started three online petitions asking the State of Texas to reconsider these rules. Her goal is to collect over 50,000 signatures from people in the “free-world” so she can lobby city and state legislators to adopt each of the petitions as bills. Although these petitions are being directed to legislators in the State of Texas, she is asking everybody in the United States to participate. We believe that once Texas recognizes the need to change some of their policies, other states will follow suit.
It is our sincere wish that our followers will consider learning more about these petitions, sign them and pass the information on to family and friends. We pray that these petitions can help inmates, like Ms. Watts son, be able to apply for parole and be an asset to society instead of our tax dollars being spent to keep them behind bars.

Below are the websites with more information about the petitions:

http://freeinmates2014.wix.com/texasinmatesmercy

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/mandatory-short-way-release

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/reduce-the-parole-eligibilit

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/mandatory-short-way-release-1